Stories

The text used in the assessment tools are great descriptors, but its stories that bring this work to life. 

Below is a growing portfolio of stories from artists and advocates from across the country that can be filtered on the assessment tools, spectrum, and categories.  You can turn on and off these filters by clicking on the buttons. 

Use these examples to help locate yourself on the assessment tool and see how to move up on the spectrum. Read our Guidebook for more suggestions on how you can use Artists Thrive, putting the tools to practice, and sparking conversations with Artists Thrive.

Have a story of your own to add?   Click here to submit it.

Making our Diversity, Equity and Inclusion Policy Public

C4 Atlanta has maintained a diverse service population since its inception. However, three years ago the Board decided to ensure that we should strive for inclusion at all levels of the organization in respect to backgrounds, but also in respect to privilege. The organization takes very seriously its role in the community as a convener; however, we also examine our relationship to individuals and how that power dynamic may have unintended consequences.

For this reason, we made our Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Policy public this last year. We also reference this site in many of our public facing materials, and we ask that our partners understand our policy. Because we carry this through our work, many of the artists with whom we work began to examine their roles in relation to community, each other, and their practice.

Rubric Spectrum Category
I work with Artists Artists Survive Power (open, equitable, and culturally relevant)

Sharing the Power of Community

So, sharing of power – or economic advantages – of two artists opening brick and mortar businesses in the same building and allowing each of them to build off of the other’s capital to make sure that they are financially secure is an example that could be held up. I think sharing in the power of voice. For example: when a burgeoning food truck movement was happening and policy came forward that was deemed restrictive and in favor of the brick and mortar restaurant culture in the community. A lot of the visual and performing artists came out to share their power to advocate on behalf of the start-up food truck business in the community. I think sharing in power, being willing to testify for how folks have directly benefitted from arts activity and how that’s led to business development in front of government, business, and other elected officials is a demonstration. We’re now looking at the youth that have at one point come through any one of those programs as a pipeline for leadership and individuals. A couple of those individuals are in the middle of a pilot program that have come from a couple of the center city neighborhoods. We’re actually sharing power with them by making them the programmatic lead in their community. So, it’s a leadership development program for these folks, but it’s sharing the power of community. There is an identity by and with the people that live in this highly localized community.

Rubric Spectrum Category
I work with Artists Artists Survive Power (open, equitable, and culturally relevant)

Artist Advisory Committees Develop Policy

We have advisory committees that incorporate many individual artists. In their advisory committees, it’s really an act of shared power, especially when you consider their contributions to helping our state agency develop our policy, our programs, and our strategic plan. The individual artists are pretty critical to us as far as being a guiding force in how we’re building our programs and being responsive to how we’re being in the field. Additionally, we have a number of individual artists on our council and on that level – on a state and national level – and their influence is welcomed and encouraged and regarded. We’ve developed a Native Leadership Cohort as well as an expanding Native arts advisory team. It consists of many individual artists, and they play a role in shaping the Native arts program so that they are culturally relevant in addressing issues around de-colonization. How a state arts agency can go about doing that is really, really significant.

Rubric Spectrum Category
I work with Artists Artists Survive Power (open, equitable, and culturally relevant)

Artist Trust Public Commitment to Organization-wide Racial Equity

Artist Trust exists to bolster the work of all artists throughout Washington State. Ensuring artists of all backgrounds and identities are included in our cultural narrative is central to having an accurate and fair depiction of our society. Artist Trust recognizes and is committed to addressing historical and ongoing disparities in access to institutional funding, recognition, business practices, and job opportunities. Our Equity statement is a part of our Who We Are page on our website and shares more about the concept of racial equity and shifting paradigms, as well as detailing what Artist Trust has done, is doing, and will continue to do as we work to develop stategies for addressing socio-cultural and economic barriers for artists at all intersections of identities. 

Rubric Spectrum Category
I work with Artists Artists Survive Power (open, equitable, and culturally relevant)

Americans for the Arts Statement of Cultural Equity

This Americans for the Arts Statement represents the culmination of a year of work and consultation with members, advisory council members, stakeholders in the arts field, board, staff, and partners throughout the nonprofit sector. In addition to our new Statement on Cultural Equity, this link also includes some supporting materials about our process and goals.

Rubric Spectrum Category
I work with Artists Artists Survive Power (open, equitable, and culturally relevant)

Grantmakers in the Arts Racial Equity in Arts Philanthropy

Grantmakers in the Arts recognizes that our society is challenged to overcome a complex web of inequities– racism, sexism, homophobia, classism, and ableism among them. All of these forms of discrimination are powerful drivers of unequal individual and group outcomes. However, it is our belief that ALAANA (African, Latino/a, Asian, Arab, and Native American) individuals whose identities intersect with those of other “minority” social statuses often experience compounded mistreatment that is amplified by the interaction of race. With our assessment that racism is one of the most pressing issues of our time, our current priority is working against racism by working toward racial equity in arts philanthropy. As such, the Grantmakers in the Arts' board of directors developed this statement of purpose for their work in racial equity in arts philanthropy with a goal to increase arts funding for ALAANA artists, arts organizations, children, and adults. 

Rubric Spectrum Category
I work with Artists Artists Survive Power (open, equitable, and culturally relevant)