Stories

The text used in the assessment tools are great descriptors, but its stories that bring this work to life. 

Below is a growing portfolio of stories from artists and advocates from across the country that can be filtered on the assessment tools, spectrum, and categories.  You can turn on and off these filters by clicking on the buttons. 

Use these examples to help locate yourself on the assessment tool and see how to move up on the spectrum. Read our Guidebook for more suggestions on how you can use Artists Thrive, putting the tools to practice, and sparking conversations with Artists Thrive.

Have a story of your own to add?   Click here to submit it.

Broader Access to Networks & Resources

The Cultural Office of the Pikes Peak Region, COPPeR, uses the AIR Institute curriculum to provide workshops in Colorado Springs that teach collaboration, design thinking, business planning and entrepreneurial mindset to local artists, creatives, business people, and community members. COPPeR has four trained facilitators who can teach the AIR:Shift Workshop. Individual artists now have broader networks and access to community resources, accountability buddies, and business planning skills. Also, because the program is designed to create local, implementable programs that encourage connections between the arts, business and community, we now have a new program that our local residents designed - Innovation Acceleration. The pilot program was purchased (new earned revenues) by our local workforce development agency - artists were paid to train 50 of their employees to access creativity and foster new ideas.

Rubric Spectrum Category
I work with Artists Artists Survive Services and Programs

Providing Opportunities for All Levels of Artists

One of the training sessions was a series of speakers who were professional public artists, fabricators, lawyers who specialized in the copyright issues, intellectual property, and other administrative issues. We called it “the nuts and bolts of public art day.” It was a kind of a crash course in all of the things that you need to know in order to pursue a career in public art, particularly in percent-for-art fund projects. We actually opened up that training session not just to the twenty-five artists who were selected to be a part of that placemaking program, but also to all of the artists who had applied but were not selected, because we felt like a lot of the reasons why those artists weren’t selected was because they didn’t have a firm grasp on what we were trying to get at in the application. We didn’t want to limit the sessions to the twenty-five who were selected but we wanted to make sure that other artists who had expressed interest in learning more about creating public art and placemaking projects had that opportunity to learn and grow.

Rubric Spectrum Category
I work with Artists Artists Survive Services and Programs

Artist Counseling, Not Just Coaching

The career-counseling piece is counseling. It’s not just advisement. It’s not just coaching. It’s really taking the person and saying, “Who are you? Who are you now? Where did you come from? What are your interests? What are your…strengths? What’s your personality type? How much money do you need? Where do you want to live? What kind of people do you want to be with?” This is a whole process and when people go through it, they land in places that are a good enough fit that they can stay there for a while and then they may want to say that “I’ve done this for awhile, what next?

Rubric Spectrum Category
I work with Artists Artists Survive Services and Programs

Artist as an Economic Driver

We started a larger program based upon a model of some grassroots artist pop-up events that were happening here. They were organizing large groups of artists in vacant buildings and blending that together with some professional practices that they had learned from a community in Washington, D.C. There are no barriers for participation, and the exhibition is non-juried. First-come first-served gets space. You have to volunteer x-number of hours to be a part of it alone, with a few volunteer requirements. The last time, between visual and performing, they had about eight hundred artists participate and over twenty thousand people come out on one of four Saturdays for the free community-based event. That has really catalyzed a change in the perception of the arts in our community: the artist is now seen as an economic driver. Nearly every building that we’ve been is moving forward into redevelopment. And many of the folks that have come through the program are starting their own brick and mortar businesses in the community.

Rubric Spectrum Category
I work with Artists Artists Survive Services and Programs

Including the Artist’s Point of View

The arts council brings together artists on a fairly regular basis. Whether they’re events, trainings and workshops, or opportunities to sell their work, or whether it’s in the community. One thing that we always do in our work in communities is to make sure that an artist’s point of view is included. A really good example of the way we’ve done this is that we have what used to be called a cultural districts program, now called the creative districts program. That’s basically a state designation of certain cities in the commonwealth that have a large capacity for arts and culture. They use this capacity to develop the community and the local economy. They really use their local arts and culture scene as an asset. So, as part of this process to be included as one of those communities, there has to be involvement from as many sectors as possible.

Two of the main things that have to happen are: one, there has to be a flagship arts organization in the community, and two, the whole creative district is basically centered around this organization. There has to be a committee that works on the creative district and is committed to improving the district. And that committee has to include artists and other arts organizations, but it also has to include the local government. The local government can’t just sign on as a partner; there are actually things they are required to do, like passing resolutions designating the districts locally. They have to be involved in several other ways. That’s one opportunity where we’ve been able to give artists and arts organizations an entrance into the inner workings of local government. We’re broadening their reach in the community and elevating their presence. We’re making sure that their perspective is always being included in decision-making times.

Rubric Spectrum Category
I work with Artists Artists Survive Services and Programs

Connecting Artists to Resources

We constantly try to make sure that artists are aware of all opportunities and resources that are available. These can be the opportunities and resources that we provide, or opportunities and resources that our grantees provide. We are trying to make them aware and also to forge relationships with organizations whose primary audience is artists. And we lobby these organizations to make sure that their constituents are primarily artists that are aware of the services and resources available to them.

Rubric Spectrum Category
I work with Artists Artists Survive Services and Programs

Artist Input Leads to Program Innovation

Cindy Ornstein, Director of Arts & Culture for the City of Mesa and Executive Director of the Mesa Arts Center, shares a successful process seeking artist input to design new, innovative programs.

Rubric Spectrum Category
I work with Artists Artists Survive Services and Programs